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Commented on Other clotting- type websites?Please share any others you know of 12 months ago

http://www.drgourmet.com/ is a great site


Commented on How do i record my INR readings? 8 months ago

hey Dean you would record your INRs by logging into inrtracker.com and clicking on the INR button (or go to this link: http://inrtracker.com/inrs) then you would fill in the blanks and click submit


Commented on food and diet 8 months ago

You're right mwashen one cup of butternut squash has 2 micro grams of vitamin k (http://inrtracker.com/nutrients/vitamin-k-in-squash-winter-butternut-cooked-baked-without-salt) so that doesn't seem to be the cause. Have you changed any medications, your exercise? Are you going outside more?


Commented on I cannot seem to keep my INR levels at 2.3 over 1 year ago

I'm sorry you're going through this. Here's some information from this page that could help you (http://inrtracker.com/inr-levels/inr-1.3) Supplements That Decrease your INR13 Supplement Recommendations/Comments CoQ10 Structurally similar to Vitamin K and, therefore, may need modest warfarin dose adjustment: Check INR within 2 weeks of starting supplement. Flaxseed May impair absorption of warfarin--separate administration Ginseng Goldenseal Psyllium/Fiber May impair absorption of warfarin--separate administration St Johns Wort Vitamin K Be consistent with supplements and multivitamins containing vitamin K Drugs That Decrease Your INR11 Drug Brand Name Aprepitant Emend© Armodafinil Nuvigil© Bosentan Tracleer© Carbamazepine Carbatrol©, Epitol©, Equetro©, Tegretol©, Tegretol©– XR, Teril© Cigarette Smoking Efavirenz Atripla©, Sustiva© Etravirine Intelence© Modafinil Provigil© Montelukast Singulair© Nafcillin Nallpen© In Plastic Container Omeprazole Nexium©, Prilosec©, Prilosec© OTC, Zegerid©, Zegerid© OTC Phenobarbital Donnatal© Phenytoin Dilantin©, Phenytek© Pioglitazone Actoplus© Met, Actoplus© Met XR, Actos©, Duetact©, Oseni© Prednisone Rayos© Rifampin Rifadin©, Rifamate©, Rifater©, Rimactane© Rufinamide Banzel© Foods That Decrease Your INR13 Could be the reason for INR of 1.3 Food Recommendations/Comments Ensure/Boost Contains ~25% of daily vitamin K and usually only significant if consuming several servings per day Goose Liver Avoid due to unpredictable influence of vitamin K2 Green Tea May lower INR in large (i.e. >1 gallon/day) quantities Liver Meats OK to eat, but treat like a vitamin K food Nopales (Cactus) OK to eat, but treat like a high vitamin K food Soy Products OK to eat, but treat like a vitamin K food Alcohol And Your INR Binge drinking alcohol will bring your INR up. Drinking 1-2 drinks will bring your INR down.13 Avoid Mangos You should avoid consumption of all foods with mango because the interaction is unclear and is different from patient to patient.13 Cranberry Juice and Grapefruit Juice UC San Diego Anticoagulation Clinic recommends, in general, an interaction between warfarin and cranberry products is NOT expected. What they advise, as with everything, is moderation - have a glass, not a gallon of cranberry juice. The same goes for grapefruit juice.13


Commented on Herbalife /vitamin K/INR changes over 1 year ago

Hey pvalenz. I'm not familiar with that meal replacement, but if your doctor is aware of the vitamin k you'll be taking it, he/she can counteract it with an appropriate warfarin dose. You would just have to be consistent in taking it, and then only change the pattern after talking to your doctor and he/she readjusts your dosage.


Commented on Warfarin 1mg/day. How much Vitamin K can I consume safely? over 1 year ago

Hey Mauvia completely avoiding vegetables isn't a super plan. I'd advise you consider seeing a new doctor. You could talk about the low dose vitamin k technique with a doctor. I quote our article here: "Many people taking Coumadin use the Low Dose Vitamin K Technique, which involves taking low dose Vitamin K supplements (always consult with your doctor before changing your diet or taking supplements!). Here's how it works. For example, on Monday you take your Vitamin K supplement of 100 mcg and eat 50mcg of Vitamin K. That is a total of 150mcg of Vitamin K on Monday. On Tuesday, you take your Vitamin K supplement of 100mcg and eat 100mcg of Vitamin K. That is a total of 200mcg of Vitamin K on Tuesday. From Monday to Tuesday, your Vitamin K total went up by 33%. Now, let's say you didn't take a Vitamin K supplement at all, but still ate 50mcg on Monday, and 100 mcg on Tuesday, then your Vitamin K total would have gone up by 100%! By taking a daily low dose Vitamin K supplement your total Vitamin K changes less day-to-day. Hence, your Warfarin dosages will change less often and your INR will be more consistent." From http://inrtracker.com/articles/diet/coumadin-diet


Commented on Getting INR stabilized over 1 year ago

Hey Eselpee I have a pet rabbit so I lol'd at this. Carrots have very little vitamin k so snack away! Same with corn, potatoes and mushrooms and a bunch of other vegetables. I link to their vitamin k levels below. http://inrtracker.com/nutrients/vitamin-k-in-carrots-raw http://inrtracker.com/nutrients/vitamin-k-in-jerusalem-artichokes-raw http://inrtracker.com/nutrients/vitamin-k-in-turnips-raw http://inrtracker.com/nutrients/vitamin-k-in-corn-sweet-yellow-canned-vacuum-pack-regular-pack http://inrtracker.com/nutrients/vitamin-k-in-squash-winter-butternut-frozen-unprepared http://inrtracker.com/nutrients/vitamin-k-in-mushrooms-white-cooked-boiled-drained-with-salt http://inrtracker.com/nutrients/vitamin-k-in-sweet-potato-cooked-baked-in-skin-flesh-without-salt http://inrtracker.com/nutrients/vitamin-k-in-peppers-sweet-red-frozen-chopped-boiled-drained-without-salt http://inrtracker.com/nutrients/vitamin-k-in-eggplant-cooked-boiled-drained-with-salt ------ Something you and your doctor can try is the low dose vitamin k technique. You can read more about it here: http://inrtracker.com/articles/diet/coumadin-diet ----- If you're curious of what vegetables are low in vitamin k, you can sort the vegetables here by lowest to highest by clicking on the arrow above vitamin k: http://inrtracker.com/food_categories/vitamin-k-in-vegetables-and-vegetable-products


Commented on Vegetable oil in brownies over 1 year ago

Hey santaan there is 200.45 mcg of vitamin k in a 1/2 cup of vegetable oil (soy bean). But, you had just 1 brownie. I'm assuming, you made a batch of at least 8 to 12. At most that's 25 mcg of vitamin k for the brownie you ate, which shouldn't be enough to throw anything off. Check out our food page here to get quick vitamin k answers: http://inrtracker.com/nutrients/vitamin-k-in-usda-commodity-food-oil-vegetable-soybean-refined http://inrtracker.com/nutrients


Commented on INR very low at 1.0 over 1 year ago

ximora I'm glad that you were on the right course of action! Sorry no one got back to you. How are you doing now?


Commented on Help, failed on Xarelto now on Warfarin over 1 year ago

Happy new year amruske!!!


Commented on Help, failed on Xarelto now on Warfarin over 1 year ago

Yeah that's frustrating. It's strange that the doctor would say it works for everyone, because otherwise there wouldn't be such a strong push to make reversal agents for them.


Commented on Help, failed on Xarelto now on Warfarin over 1 year ago

amruske sounds like you've been through a lot! Xarelto is pretty new, so it's bound to not work for some people and work for others. There isn't a lot of history around Xarelto. I wouldn't take this too hard. Reducing your warfarin dosage should lower your INR, as long as your vitamin k has stayed relatively stable.


Commented on INR 9.0 no warfrin x2 days almost 2 years ago

Thanks for sharing this tnthompson. How is your son doing now?


Commented on INR 9.0 no warfrin x2 days almost 2 years ago

Phew!! I'm glad that was it. Be sure to do regular INR checkups :)


Commented on New to the site with PE and Warfarin questions... almost 2 years ago

"Mother F'er Gene" - LOL. Wow, that's a good one hahaha. And, congrats on your baby boy! I'm sorry to hear about your PE and lung at such a young age, about the additional clots you got around your heart and your partial hysterectomy. I can tell you're a cool cat, the way you nonchalantly talk about the tough experiences you've had. The way you throw jokes around - wow - you're awesome. You may want to check out these posts and talk with the people on there and ask to get feedback regarding what you're going through. They will all get notified via email of your message. http://inrtracker.com/discuss/inr-9-0-no-warfrin-x2-days http://inrtracker.com/discuss/inr-swings http://inrtracker.com/discuss/does-stress-affect-inr


Commented on INR 9.0 no warfrin x2 days almost 2 years ago

Hey Merill are you ok now?


Commented on Blood clots due to Protein S Functional deficiency almost 2 years ago

I hope it works out too. Let me know when your INR goes back up!


Commented on Vitamin C and coumadin almost 2 years ago

Hey Chelsea. Note: 1 g of vitamin c is 1000 mg. "There is some evidence, though controversial, that vitamin C interacts with anticoagulant medications (blood thinners) like warfarin (Coumadin). Large doses of vitamin C may block the action of warfarin, requiring an increase in dose to maintain its effectiveness. Individuals on anticoagulants should limit their vitamin C intake to 1 gram/day and have their prothrombin time monitored by the clinician following their anticoagulant therapy." That was taken from here: http://lpi.oregonstate.edu/mic/vitamins/vitamin-C


Commented on Chicken vit k discrepancies almost 2 years ago

Hey Cindy, all the vitamin k stats are from the USDA, so we're confident that they're accurate. Could you link me to the ones that are different from one another?


Commented on Technical question almost 2 years ago

Hey there! Thank you :) We're working on adding other drugs in. Thanks for mentioning lovenox. We'll throw it into our todo.


Commented on Mobile app almost 2 years ago

Hey Maddie, we're working on this. It'll be ready in 2016 :)


Commented on Blood clots due to Protein S Functional deficiency almost 2 years ago

Hey Jeet, I would ask your doctor about possibly taking more warfarin to increase your INR. You could use this tool to see if there's anything causing your INR to be low. You just put your inr in, your target range and it'll pop out a bunch of information for you: http://inrtracker.com/inr-levels


Commented on vit K supplementation to stabilize INRs almost 2 years ago

Also, in the study it was a 100 mcg vitamin k supplement that the people took.


Commented on INR 9.0 no warfrin x2 days almost 2 years ago

Hey Merill can you describe what other drugs you're currently taking or have taken recently? What about any diet changes?


Commented on Request for new Ailment under Wellness almost 2 years ago

This is a great suggestion. I'll work on this :)


Commented on Difficulty working the vit k food database.Help? almost 2 years ago

Oh I understand. To post to the website support, you just select that category when making the post :)


Commented on Difficulty working the vit k food database.Help? almost 2 years ago

Hey Cindy, I moved your post to the website support section. I hope you don't mind :). So when you go to http://inrtracker.com/nutrients (alternatively you can get to this by hovering over the "Learn" drop-down at the top of the screen and clicking on "Vitamin K Food Database"). Then in the search box, start typing out the food that you want to learn about and find it from the drop list provided. If you click on the food then you'll get to it's page. Food pages include a nutritional calculator, a dynamic chart that shows how much of a food you can eat based on vitamin k content, comparisons of a food's vitamin k content to dozens of other foods. Alternatively you can browse foods by the category it's in here: http://inrtracker.com/food_categories/vitamin-k-in-vegetables-and-vegetable-products On the side you'll see a whole bunch of categories to browse. Let me know if you have any other questions. I hope you have an awesome weekend :). Best, Pavan


Commented on INR swings about 2 years ago

Thanks for updating us :) Glad you're dad is getting on track! That's great news. Something else to keep in mind is that sunlight contains vitamin d, and you can get a lot if you stay out in the sun. I used a sunlight vitamin d calculator with a focus on florida on a non cloudy day and it said that in 4 minutes one can get up to 25 mcg of vitamin D from sunlight. Now, the ineraction between vitamin D and warfarin isn't great, but if your dad is getting large amounts of vitamin D into his system, that may be impacting his therapy. It's something to bring up to the doctor.


Commented on INR swings about 2 years ago

Hey Tony, plain vanilla ice cream has very little vitamin k in it (around 2 mcg of vitamin k while the daily recommended amount vitamin k by the USDA is 90 mcg). A cup of cooked turkey has around 6 mcg of vitamin k. A cup of cooked soy beans however have more vitamin k - around 30 mcg. Still, these foods don't have much vitamin k. A cup of cooked kale has over 1000 mcg of vitamin k (over 10 times what is recommended by the USDA). I suggest you take a look here: http://inrtracker.com/articles/diet/coumadin-diet http://inrtracker.com/nutrients http://inrtracker.com/articles/quizzes


Commented on vit K supplementation to stabilize INRs almost 2 years ago

Hey Cindy, Glad you're taking the plunge :) Study by renowned warfarin clinician and founder of the clot care non profit: http://www.clotcare.com/vitaminkstabilizesinrs.pdf Please update us with what your doctor says and what your results are. I'm sure the community will appreciate it.


Commented on Factor V Leiden about 2 years ago

"Aspirin works by inhibiting the clotting functions of platelets" - http://www.heartpoint.com/coumadin.html So considering switching to aspirin now might not be a good plan until your platelet count goes back up. Warfarin works by breaking up the vitamin k recycling process in your body, so it doesn't affect the blood's platelets. ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- A low platelet count can be caused by a few things. I'll list three. 1. Causes of Impaired Platelet Production 2. Increased Platelet Destruction 3. your spleen enlarging can cause a low platelet count Quick ways to be safe: An ultrasound of your spleen and a bone marrow check would knock out the possibilities of 1 and 3 above. Also, upping your iron and vitamin b12 intake could fix any deficiencies you have that could be causing the low platelet count. Many of the most common supplements, including omega-threes and St. John's Wort interfere with platelets so I would consider stop taking them with your doctor. I would also stay hydrated. Let's go into detail about 1 and 2: 1. Causes of Impaired Platelet Production - vitamin B12 deficiency (doesn't interact with warfarin) - iron deficiency - viral infections that affect bone marrow: parvovirus, rubella, mumps, varicella (chickenpox), hepatitis C, Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and HIV. - some medications that affect bone marrow: chloramphenicol, gold, phenytoin (Dilantin), valproic acid (Depakene, Depakote, Depakote ER, Depacon, thiazide medications - radiation affects bone marrow - congenital disorders (Fanconi's anemia) affect bone marrow. - Many chemotherapeutic drugs commonly cause bone marrow toxicity and a low platelet count. - alcohol toxicity from long-term alcohol abuse - leukemias and lymphomas - cancers invading the bone marrow 2. Increased Platelet Destruction - certain medications: sulfonamide antibiotics, carbamazepine (Tegretol, Tegretol XR , Equetro, Carbatrol), digoxin (Lanoxin), quinine (Quinerva, Quinite, QM-260), quinidine (Quinaglute, Quinidex), acetaminophen, and rifampin) - transfusion reactions - heparin destroys platelets to get its thinning effect - The above information was summarized from this article which was written by and reviewed by multiple doctors: http://www.emedicinehealth.com/thrombocytopenia_low_platelet_count/page2_em.htm#thrombocytopenia_causes ---------------------------------------------------------------------------- Having a low platelet count w/ warfarin is not a great situation. Here are some preventative measures you can take: This document from Ohio State University gives great preventative measures while one has a low platelet count: https://patienteducation.osumc.edu/Documents/prevent.pdf This is an additional document on preventative measures from UPENN: http://www.oncolink.org/treatment/article.cfm?c=2&s=13&id=69


Commented on Factor V Leiden about 2 years ago

Hey Jay, could you let us know if your platelet count is below 50,000? Also, what other medicines are you taking? Can you describe your diet and activity level? Do you have any of these conditions? Do you have a stent or another type of medical device? This will all help the community give you better advice :). Antiphospholipid Syndrome (also called Hughes syndrome) Antithrombin III deficiency Atrial Fibrillation Bone Marrow Disorder, like Polycythemia Vera (PV) Thrombocythemia Cancer (presently have or had) Congenital Heart Defects Diabetes Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation (DIC) Factor V Leiden Heart failure Medical devices Protein C Deficiency Protein S Deficiency Thrombotic Thrombocytopenic Purpura (TTP) Valvular heart disease Vasculitis


Commented on Hughes disease (aka) antiphospholipid studies: does anyone know of? about 2 years ago

Yes you're right Cindy. They can give inaccurate high INRs which could lead to dire consequences. It's better to go to the lab. I would continue to talk to the APS Foundation of America. They're experts on this matter.


Commented on Really Low INR about 2 years ago

@Cindy in nj thank you for the shout out! @rki9998 We spent months writing this to make it perfect: http://inrtracker.com/articles/diet/coumadin-diet It tells you everything you have to know about your diet, drugs, and everything else. On a more personal note, are you taking any new drugs, supplements? I can look up each one for you to see if they interact with Warfarin.


Commented on About INR self testing machine/supplies about 2 years ago

Hey Cindy :) This youtube video shows how a home INR Machine is used: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pOyw46PTkB0 Doctor Bussey (a renowned clinical pharmacist and warfarin therapy clinician) of clotcare.com wrote a very detailed guide on the accuracy of INRs from labs and from at home devices - http://www.clotcare.com/faq_inrreliability.aspx If you have APS, the at home INR Machines have accuracy issues. Dr. Bussey talks about this at the end of his article. People who have APS should keep going to the lab and not use these devices. This is also backed by the APS Foundation of America.


Commented on My Name is Veronica, Co-Founder of INR Tracker, and I have a blood clotting disorder. Ask me anything. over 2 years ago

Hey Cindy I'm a Co-Founder of INRTracker :) I originally made the first version of INRTracker based on the experiences that Veronica went through. Veronica and I both have a goal and vision to make the lives of those on warfarin better, easier and safer.


Commented on Hughes disease (aka) antiphospholipid studies: does anyone know of? about 2 years ago

Cindy, I am so sorry about what you went through! I wish they would've given you heparin right away and bridged you onto warfarin. There's something called the low dose vitamin k technique. It can help you regulate your INRs without having to worry too much about vitamin k :). You can read all about it here. We spent months writing this to make it perfect: http://inrtracker.com/articles/diet/coumadin-diet


Commented on Hughes disease (aka) antiphospholipid studies: does anyone know of? about 2 years ago

Hey Cindy could you tell us about your history with Warfarin, your INRs, how long you've been on it and any clots you've had? We'll be better able to help you with that :)


Commented on INR swings about 2 years ago

Hey your dad seems like he's a very careful man. That's great to hear! I can only hope my parents are as careful. Exercise increases a person's metabolism which may decrease the time warfarin lives in the body, hence lower INRs. That could be the cause of your dad's INRs being lower than 2. Here's a study from the government backing what I just said: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15107008 What's your dad's target INR range set by his doctor? Bringing the above study to his doctor's attention can help his doctor make better dosage decisions for the days your dad exercises. Also, has your dad taken any new drugs or supplements? I can look up the interactions for you :)


Commented on high INR today about 2 years ago

Hmm that's strange that it shot up that high without a diet change or any new drugs. Have you gotten sick, started a new exercise regiment, gone to a steam room or have been under a lot of stress lately?


Commented on high INR today about 2 years ago

Hey Kennie, this must be really frustrating. Have you taken any new drugs recently? What's your diet like? When do you take your warfarin dosage?


Commented on real low inr about 2 years ago

That's really frustrating that your hospital doesn't take your complaints seriously. Has your diet changed recently? Have you taken any new drugs? Have you been sick recently? Any of those could have impacted your INR. I would be on the lookout for these blood clot symptoms. If you have them, then your hospital must take this seriously. I would ask the hospital for a D-Dimer Blood Test. It won't confirm that you have a blood clot, but it'll tell you if you don't have one. Keep in mind that the test is faulty if you're pregnant. - Sudden weakness in any limb - New numbness or tingling anywhere - Visual changes - Sudden onset of slurred speech or inability to speak - Dizziness, faintness, loss of balance (lack of coordination) - New pain, swelling, redness, or heat in your body part(s) - New shortness of breath or chest pain - Sudden, intense, severe headache


Commented on My Name is Veronica, Co-Founder of INR Tracker, and I have a blood clotting disorder. Ask me anything. over 2 years ago

In regards to genetics: ----------------------- I would get checked up to see if you have any of these: Antiphospholipid Syndrome (also called Hughes syndrome), Antithrombin III deficiency, Atrial Fibrillation, Congenital Heart Defects, Factor V Leiden, Protein C Deficiency and Protein S Deficiency If you know that then your doctor can be specific in treatment In regards to what tests are good for what: ---------------------------------------- It is generally considered that the Duplex Ultrasound Test is great for diagnosing clots in large veins above the knee (95% sensitivity Source: 1) but only moderately effective for diagnosing clots below the knee (73.55% sensitivity Source: 1). MRI Tests do a better job than Duplex Ultrasound Tests for the Pelvis, Abdomen, and Chest because it doesn't use compression. Sources: 1. "Deep Vein Thrombosis: A Clinical Review." Journal of Blood Medicine. April 26, 2011. Accessed April 22, 2015. http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.349.5069&rep=rep1&type=pdf.


Commented on My Name is Veronica, Co-Founder of INR Tracker, and I have a blood clotting disorder. Ask me anything. over 2 years ago

That's interesting that you're on 4 mg everyday. I've heard taking the same warfarin dosage everyday stabilizes fluctuating INRs. Thanks for sharing gunfire!


Commented on My Name is Veronica, Co-Founder of INR Tracker, and I have a blood clotting disorder. Ask me anything. over 2 years ago

It's infuriating that your doctor (PCP) didn't do an ultrasound or an MRI based off your clotting history. I'm sorry that you didn't get the best care possible.


Commented on My Name is Veronica, Co-Founder of INR Tracker, and I have a blood clotting disorder. Ask me anything. over 2 years ago

Hey Bebe thanks for sharing your story. Anywhere between 1-5% of the world has Hughes Syndrome so you're not alone! I'm glad you're still eating your veggies, because it's still important no matter what anyone says :) vitamin k alone helps prevent osteoporosis.


Commented on Question about Tracking Vit K about 2 years ago

Hey Pineapplegirl you can use INRTracker.com for this :) You can watch this demo video on how to do so: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r7StRsZ1XRQ Alternatively, if you want to quickly check the vitamin k of something you can go here: http://inrtracker.com/nutrients


Commented on "What did you consume?" field missing. about 2 years ago

your welcome Lavender Song!


Commented on "What did you consume?" field missing. about 2 years ago

Hey Lavender let me know if this video demo helps: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r7StRsZ1XRQ If it doesn't, I'll be happy to assist you further :)


Commented on Report not showing BPs about 2 years ago

Just fixed this :)


Commented on Blood pressure readings missing about 2 years ago

Hey epinard I fixed this. BP results should show up in your report now. Sorry about the bug! Thank you for alerting us about it!


Commented on INR up tp 6.4 about 2 years ago

you're welcome Kennie!


Commented on My Name is Veronica, Co-Founder of INR Tracker, and I have a blood clotting disorder. Ask me anything. over 2 years ago

Hey gunfire. I'm sorry to hear about the auto accident and low INR. I've heard of stress causing high INRs, but not low INRs. I'm glad you're fine now, and that you've had consistent INRs for 3 to 4 years. Do you have any secrets to keeping a consistent INR?


Commented on INR up tp 6.4 about 2 years ago

Hey Kennie thanks for posting. I'm so sorry for your recent DVT. The co-founder of inrtracker has factor v leiden too. You can read about her story on this post: http://inrtracker.com/discuss/my-name-is-veronica-co-founder-of-inr-tracker-and-i-have-a-blood-clott VITAMIN K AND WARFARIN ---------------------- The USDA recommends 90 mcg (micro grams) of vitamin k daily for adults. Doctors will want you to take the same amount of vitamin k daily because your warfarin dosage basically works against the vitamin k in your body. And if you take a different amount of vitamin k, then your Warfarin dosage will be off and that's why your INR will be out of a target range of 2.5 to 3.5. However, there's a way of making this easier for you in the next paragraph I'm writing. VITAMIN K AND WARFARIN - THE BETTER WAY -------------- Some people on Warfarin take a small dosage of vitamin k daily (50 mcg to 100 mcg). This way any extra vitamin k they get will be a minor change in comparison to their vitamin k supplement. So you take the supplement, and then be careful not to eat anything that has a lot of vitamin k (kale, collards, spinach, chard), but other than that, you don't worry about vitamin k for the most part. You can quickly learn about what foods have how much vitamin k here: http://inrtracker.com/nutrients and here: http://inrtracker.com/articles/quizzes/vitamin-k-quiz-1-easy The amount of vitamin k in your supplement you would be taking should be discussed with your doctor. It depends on the amount of warfarin you're taking, your target INR range, your height, weight, etc. Your doctor would make sure your warfarin dosage reflects this daily vitamin k supplement regiment you would be undergoing. Definitely talk to your doctor about this. Both the Blood Clot Recovery Network (http://inrtracker.com/profile/blood-clot-recovery-network) and the APS Foundation of America (http://inrtracker.com/profile/aps-foundation-of-america) recommend this. You can read what they wrote in their profiles. VITAMIN K IS IMPORTANT! -------------- Now it might seem like vitamin k is bad, but it's important for transporting calcium throughout the body, reducing bone loss, decreasing the risk of bone fractures as well as assisting your body in its ability to naturally clot during bleeding episodes. So you definitely need vitamin k in your diet. Don't let anyone (including health care professionals) tell you otherwise! People who don't get enough of it - develop osteoporosis later in life. WAYS TO IMPROVE YOUR CIRCULATION ---------------------- Quick things you can do to improve your circulation: wear compression socks, keep your legs elevated, and if you're sitting down or traveling - make sure you move your legs around every 5 minutes or so to keep your circulation up. MORE INFO ON AN INR OF 6.4 ---------------------- You can learn a lot about an inr of 6.4 here: http://inrtracker.com/inr-levels/inr-6.4


Commented on INR gone up about 2 years ago

np Sarah! If your doctor was the one who prescribed the antibiotics - then I'm very annoyed that he/she didn't know to reduce the warfarin. When a doctor is done with med school, it doesn't mean he/she is also done thinking and learning. As patients, we just need to learn as much as possible to get the best treatment. For your doctor to just say continue on your warfarin dosage even though you're on antibiotics and your INR is high makes me question this doctor's intelligence. I hope it wouldn't be too much trouble finding a new doctor. Zocdoc.com lets you search through doctors with verified reviews - maybe you can try that :) Please update me on how you're doing. I really hope your INR goes down, your surgery is a success and that you get treatment from a new caring smart doctor.


Commented on Report not showing BPs about 2 years ago

Hey epinard, i'll look into this.


Commented on My Name is Veronica, Co-Founder of INR Tracker, and I have a blood clotting disorder. Ask me anything. over 2 years ago

Thank you Sara! Unfortunately there is a lack of awareness around Factor V Leiden, and it's disconcerting because it affects around 10 million Americans. But we will change that!


Commented on does Stress affect INR ? about 2 years ago

Hey Janet, I'm so sorry about the elevated INR of 5.2. Heart failure will cause stress for anyone. I would be stressed out too. The government did a study called "Effect of stress on international normalized ratio during warfarin therapy" I'll summarize the study: two patients taking Warfarin both went through stress and their INRs spiked up. Nothing else changed for the patients other than their stress levels. The scientists couldn't come up with a definite relationship between the patients' stress and the elevated INRs However, what the scientists did come up with is that Warfarin may stay in the body longer than normal if you are undergoing stress - and that's why your INR gets spiked. So maybe try doing something you enjoy and love, and see if your INR goes back to normal. I would also check here to see if something else could have caused your INR of 5.2: http://inrtracker.com/inr-levels/inr-5.2 And here's the link to the government study: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11918508


Commented on INR gone up about 2 years ago

Sarah, I'm so sorry that your INR spiked up. And you are right about your INR spiking up because of the antibiotics. Something interesting is that there is bacteria in your gut that naturally make vitamin k. So you can get vitamin k from food, and you also get it natrually from the bacteria in your gut. The way warfarin "thins" your blood and increases your INR (a normal INR is 1, and on warfarin the ideal INR is 2 to 3.5) is that the warfarin "acts against" the vitamin k in your body (made by the bacteria in your gut and from your diet). However, when you take Antibiotics, it kills the bacteria in your gut, and so there's less vitamin k in your system, and so the Warfarin has "less vitamin k to work against", so your blood gets "really thin" and your INR goes up really high. What your doctor should have done was decrease your Warfarin dosage while you were on antibiotics. There's a bunch of treatment options your doctor can take to reduce your INR, you can read about them here: http://inrtracker.com/inr-levels/inr-6.2 (What an INR Level of 6.2 means) Being on warfarin and going into surgery is tricky, and you're absolutely right. Your INR needs to get in control before you go into it. Something unrelated that I'd like to share is that while you're recovering from surgery, the nurses should be helping you get mobile so you're not stagnant on the hospital bed for long after surgery. You should also request a compression like device to go on your legs after surgery to increase circulation while you're laying down. Here's an article backing up what I said about the antibiotics from Harvard: http://www.health.harvard.edu/heart-health/warfarin-users-beware-of-antibiotics


Commented on INR 7.5 & bi-pass surgeries about 2 years ago

I would have tests done to see if you have any of the following: Antiphospholipid Syndrome (also called Hughes syndrome), Antithrombin III deficiency, Factor V Leiden, Protein C Deficiency, Protein S Deficiency. If you have Antiphospholipid Syndrome - then you should do vein draws based on the APS Foundation's advice. I'm sorry you're scarring from vein draws, but as the APS foundation mentioned above, your INR reading will be more accurate. Having inaccurate INR readings can cause serious consequences. If your INR is normal, and the meter gives an inaccurate reading due to you having APS, then the doctor can give you more or less warfarin than you need and that can lead to a bleeding or clotting episode. So in conclusion, find out what you have, and if you have APS, then do vein draws to get the most accurate INR readings. Best of luck halinkaii.


Commented on My Name is Veronica, Co-Founder of INR Tracker, and I have a blood clotting disorder. Ask me anything. over 2 years ago

Sandy, I'm so sorry about your dvt and pe history. In regards to the vitamin k in "1 cup of creamed low fat cottage cheese" - it has very little vitamin k. It has anywhere from 0 to 1 mcg of vitamin k. The USDA recommends 90 mcg of vitamin k per day, so 1 cup of creamed low fat cottage cheese that has less than 1 mcg of vitamin k shouldn't be anything to worry about.


Commented on inr is 4.0 over 2 years ago

Congratulations! That's great to hear. You're a model patient :)


Commented on INR is too thin over 2 years ago

Hey kaylnn, how are you doing now? Did you end up going to the ER or doctor to see what was going on with your headaches? It's best to go just to be safe. Please let us know how it all went after things settle down.


Commented on inr is 4.0 over 2 years ago

That's great you're getting your inr checked. Keeping regular tabs of your inr when you're trying new things (food, medicine) will let your doctor figure out potential changes in your warfarin dosages before your INR gets out of control. As a patient, it's important to be aware of everything (vitamin k in foods, changes in medicine you're taking). It'll not only give you the feeling of control, but it'll also let you speak to medical professionals at an intelligent level, which will ultimately give you the best care. I'd play through our vitamin k quizzes to learn quickly: http://inrtracker.com/articles/quizzes/vitamin-k-quiz-1-easy


Commented on inr is 4.0 over 2 years ago

From the food database here it shows that coleslaw has 85+ mcg of vitamin k. http://inrtracker.com/nutrients/vitamin-k-in-restaurant-family-style-coleslaw Even though coleslaw has a decent amount of vitamin k, in moderation it should be fine. Don't eat a ton of it. http://inrtracker.com/inr-levels/inr-4.0 Based off of the above page, if you experience an unusual or severe headache, a severe stomach ache, prolonged menstrual bleeding, a nosebleed, vomiting blood, bleeding from the gums, blood in urine, bloody or dark stool then you should seek immediate help. The sooner the better. It could end up being nothing, but it could be signs of internal bleeding.


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